The Starry Night – 1889

w1siziisijezmza3nsjdlfsiccisimnvbnzlcnqilcitcmvzaxplide0ndb4mtq0mfx1mdazzsjdxq
The Starry Night (1889)

.

The Starry Night (June, 1889 in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence) #tb#masterpiece
.
Vincent was 36 years old
.
Oil on Canvas
74cm x 92cm
Permanent Collection at The Museum of Modern Arts (@themuseumofmodernart), New York
.
“After the sun’s good night kiss,
it was as if this hamlet, this field, these hills,
everything around, silent and grateful, once more recalled,
the richness and peace they had enjoyed,
before wrapping themselves in the cloak of evening dew to sleep.”
(Excerpt of a poem taken from “The Pauper” by Jan van Beers in the letter from #vangogh to Haanebeek Family in London, 2nd July, 1873)
.
“A starry sky, for example. See, that’s a thing I’d like to try to do, just as by day I want to try to paint a green meadow spangled with starry dandelions. Yet how can I do it, unless I work it out at home, and from my imagination? Of course, this faults my idea while yours gets praised.” (From #vvg to Emile Bernard, Arles, 9th April 1888)
.
“When you have looked at [the starry night study] for some time, and that of the ivy as well, it will perhaps give you some idea, better than words could, of the things that Gauguin and Bernard and I sometimes used to talk about, and which we’ve thought about a good deal; it is not a return to the romantic or to religious ideas, no. Nevertheless, by going the way of Delacroix, more than is apparent, by colour and a more spontaneous drawing than delusive precision, one could express the purer nature of a countryside compared with the suburbs and cabarets of Paris.” (From #vvg to #tvg, Saint-Remy, 17th or 18th June, 1889)
.
“Paul Signac on his visit to Vincent van Gogh in Arles, Spring 1889: [Vincent] led me to his apartments in Lamartine Square, where I saw his marvellous pictures, his [masterpiece]: the Starry Night. Imagine the splendour of those whitewashed walls, on which flowered those colourings in their full freshness.” (Excerpt taken from Gustave Coquiot to Unknown, Paris, 1932)
.
Have you seen this painting in person?
.
http://www.instagram.com/vincent.willem.vangogh

.

How did you like it?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s